Builder Kim’s Scenery Builds

Hers a quick update from the incredible Builder Kim about his latest scratch built scenery.

“Hi Dan,

I’ve been working on green houses. It’s HO scale and is made from cut and sanded popsicle sticks. On the left are two tops off of dish soap bottles. Either paint them or leave them as is. They make for a good load on flatbed trucks.

greenhouse and flatbed

Just need to add a few more windows, plants and a door, also lights in and out. I have two more I will be working on and those will be better. Once I’m done loading plants and tools, I will seal up the back of it. I’ve added the dish soap bottle lids to a flatbed so you can see what they look like. I will paint them later to look like generators.

flatbed and greenhouse

I’ve included a photo as to the size you need for HO scale. Cut the popsicle sticks to size,  then sand them and paint. I used craft acrylic paint. $1 for a 4 oz bottle. You add about a thimble amount of water to a cup and add the paint to delute it. Paint all the parts you have cut and sanded. Make a bunch. The whole frame of this house is the cut and sanded and painted pieces. If you place a piece of clear thin tossed away plastic on top of the drawing the glue wont stick and will come up easy, so no paper gets glued to the wood. I use white carpenter glue. Don’t smother the pieces with glue or it will harden with all lumpy, nasty, hard and almost impossible to remove without destroying a painted piece. As you see in the drawing the angle the pieces are sitting is where you cut and after they will line up to make the frame. Do two, then add another pieces across the angle cuts and glue. Now after the two pieces are solid, glue another long piece joining each of those frames standing up 3 inches long on both sides. Now after they are standing proud, glue a very slightly wider piece like the bunch you did and join the beam to the top of the two frames you made.

popsicle stick

 

greenhouse frame

Looking good.You can see in the next photo the wider beam up top. Now take another of the pieces you did and run one across like in photo and do both sides. Add smaller pieces as you go. For the glass I used tossed away clear plastic. One piece on both sides of the roof and the sides, as well as the front and back.

greenhouse

I carefully used a tiny drop of clear instant glue to different points on the inside of the frames to hold the plastic. The brick has two popsicle sticks stuck together and printed brick paper glued around them. Keep the top of the popsicle and brick paper flat so when it is dry it is level all the way across. You will be adding more wood on top of the brick work for the side window frames as in photo. Another note try and keep the popsicle sticks with brick paper same or very close to the width of the piece for the frame. I used same wood for the selves and table. The floor is popsicle sticks sanded and glued into place.

greenhouse interior

I will send in a update on the green house when done. Any questions just ask.

Thanks
Builder Kim”

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Dan Morgan

Dan Morgan fell in love with model trains at the age of six when he visited an NMRA Convention in Seattle with his father. Forty two years later, his passion remains just as strong. After achieving a successful career in architecture, Dan’s particular interest is within layouts and buildings. With a wealth of knowledge on the subject, Dan loves nothing more than sharing this with others and is delighted in the forum of members who are brought together over the hobby they have in common. Dan lives with his wife Helen in Washington. As a professional painter, Helen has learnt through Dan about Model Trains and they now enjoy working on projects together. The only member of the family who isn’t allowed to join in is their over-enthusiastic Labrador called William who has been strictly banned from the workshop! You can find Dan on Google here!
About The Author

Dan Morgan

Dan Morgan fell in love with model trains at the age of six when he visited an NMRA Convention in Seattle with his father. Forty two years later, his passion remains just as strong. After achieving a successful career in architecture, Dan’s particular interest is within layouts and buildings. With a wealth of knowledge on the subject, Dan loves nothing more than sharing this with others and is delighted in the forum of members who are brought together over the hobby they have in common.
Dan lives with his wife Helen in Washington. As a professional painter, Helen has learnt through Dan about Model Trains and they now enjoy working on projects together. The only member of the family who isn’t allowed to join in is their over-enthusiastic Labrador called William who has been strictly banned from the workshop! You can find Dan on Google here!